Posts Tagged ‘Yoga for Stress’

Yoga’s Surprising Health Benefits

 

Seated Twist

Stretch yourself to a healthier heart, a better night’s sleep, and a happier outlook.

By Hagar Scher; taken from Fitness Magazine

For centuries, yoga gurus have said this ancient mind-body practice can do more than just keep you fit and flexible. In fact, they believe that regularly twisting your body like a pretzel on a sticky mat will yield incredible health benefits — staving off insomnia, extra pounds, even heart disease. Skeptical? We were too, at first, so we did some digging to see if we could track down legitimate research to back up these bold claims. Here’s what we found:

Lower-Back Pain

Yoga increases the range of motion in your hips, which can reduce lower-back pain, says Loren M. Fishman, MD, coauthor of Relief is in the Stretch: End Low Back Pain Through Yoga (W.W. Norton & Company, 2005). In fact, a small study of older women (ages 44 to 62), presented at the American College of Sports Medicine’s annual meeting last year, suggests that yoga increases lower-back flexibility and diminishes pain. A word of caution: People suffering from persistent lower-back pain need a professional diagnosis before embracing yoga, because both backbends and forward bends can exacerbate some back conditions.

Heart Health

Practicing yoga for an hour and a half three times a week can make your heart healthier in just six weeks, says recent research from the Yale University School of Medicine. The 33 men and women who did just that lowered their blood pressure and improved their blood vessels’ ability to expand and contract by 17 percent. “How well the blood vessels dilate is a good indication of how healthy the heart is,” says Satish Sivasankaran, MD, author of the study. Researchers speculate that the improvement is due to the stress-reducing benefits of yoga.

Weight Control

Researchers can’t say exactly why, but two recent studies show that yoga helps with weight loss and maintenance. After surveying more than 15,000 adults, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle found that those who didn’t practice yoga gained about 18.5 pounds more over a 10-year period than those who practiced for at least four years. A second study from the Preventive Medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, California, found that people who practiced yoga and meditation regularly, exercised, and watched their diet lost more weight than those who exercised and ate a healthy diet but skipped yoga.

Insomnia

Yoga can calm the whirling of the mind, which is helpful for insomniacs, who often have elevated levels of mental and emotional arousal, says Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, PhD, an instructor in medicine, division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School. He recently published a study which found that a half hour to 45 minutes of daily yoga practice — emphasizing meditation and breathing — helped chronic insomniacs sleep through the night. On average, the subjects increased their overall sleep time by 12 percent.

Anxiety and Depression

Yogic breathing techniques are powerful tools for alleviating serious anxiety and depression and neutralizing the negative effects of stress, says recent research in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. That’s because yogic breathing can lower the heart rate and calm the nervous system, says Patricia L. Gerbarg, MD, an assistant professor of clinical psychiatry at New York Medical College in Valhalla, New York, and one of the study’s authors.

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Beginnings–

Hello friends,

Welcome to the new home for Tasha’s yoga news, tips, and more–

I’ll be updating regularly with insights from teaching, reading, and practicing, and I’ll keep an ongoing journal of the postures/etc practiced in my December classes (so that students can review at home if they’d like).  

Check back to find out what’s been inspiring my practice (like the quote below), as well as tips for managing stress, sleeping better, developing patience and compassion, fighting fatigue, finding motivation, combatting illness, dealing with negative emotions, and improving physical health.  

Yes, more to come.  We’ll make this the tentative and happy beginning.  Cheers!

“The basic teaching of Yoga is to cultivate strength and steadiness of mind alongside the flexibility of spirit that allows you to move through the most challenging situations with wisdom…

“Your response to change reveals your basic notion of yourself…

“Vision is a living, breathing thing whose very inspiration depends on spontaneity… It is the flexible, strong mind of a Yoga practitioner that will have the humility to let go of the past when appropriate, move forward with necessary, and accept the bell of change when it rings…

“You will see in the world what you have cultivated within yourself.”

–From Kino Macgregor in Yoga +